The Office of Small Business Relief (OSBR) is focused on identifying and providing direct support to the state's nearly 950,000 small businesses to help during the current public health crisis and to position them for a strong rebound.

Responsible RestartOhio

For up-to-date information on sector specific operating requirements, continued closures, and other resources related to the reopening of Ohio businesses, click here.

Personal Protective Equipment

Ohio Emergency PPE Makers’ Exchange The Ohio Emergency PPE Makers’ Exchange, launched by the Ohio Manufacturing Alliance to Fight COVID-19, is an online marketplace where organizations that need personal protective equipment (PPE) and related equipment can find a wide selection offered by Ohio manufacturers. This online exchange offers PPE and related equipment for health care workers, first responders, and small businesses. It’s especially well-suited for organizations that may have lower-volume needs, such as nursing homes, police departments, and small business employers.

The Alliance has screened to the best of its ability for only Ohio manufacturers, but it has not vetted each product and vendor.

The Alliance also has created this list of practical things manufacturers need to be thinking about and do today to prepare for COVID-19.

JobsOhio PPE Database Several Ohio companies are working to increase the supply of in-demand medical PPE. JobsOhio has partnered with OMA, the Administration and with our Regional Network partners to provide assistance. A list of manufacturers, distributors and potential contract manufacturers to connect with these resources is available through JobsOhio’s Ohio Safe. Ohio Working. website.

Additional Resources In addition to the resources available via the Ohio Manufacturing Alliance and JobsOhio, the Ohio Development Services Agency and the Ohio Department of Administrative Services has compiled another list of vendors providing various PPE is available here PDF.

DISCLAIMER: Links on this page are to third party websites not controlled or monitored by Ohio Development Services Agency. Development is not responsible for any materials, information or content posted on any linked third-party website. The inclusion of any links or contact information on this page does not imply any relationship or association between the Ohio Development Services Agency, the State of Ohio, and the listed business; nor is it an advertisement or endorsement of the linked websites. Information is provided for user convenience and information purposes only. You are responsible for your access to linked websites or contact of any individual or business

Preparing to Reopen
Preparing to reopen

Preparing to Reopen

Download this section as a fact sheet PDF

Though your business may be closed, now is the time to start preparing for your next chapter. We recommend you develop a well thought out plan for when you can open again. While not all businesses are brick and mortar, many of these tips can be applied to your business. Focusing on the highlighted areas below will help make the transition easier for you, your employees and your customers. People across the country are rooting for the small business community, making this an opportunity for you to solidify existing customer relationships and to welcome new customers.

  1. Plan Use your time now to develop a plan for your reopening the first 3 months. Consider what you have learned during this time that will benefit you and your business in the future. Define goals and create a to-do list of items with target deadlines. Develop and refine your disaster plan. Unfortunately as we’ve learned through this experience, disasters can happen to anyone and it’s a matter of “when” not “if” one will occur. Use this time to prepare for the next potential business interruption.
  2. Employees A successful relaunch and recovery of your business will depend on your ability to retain talent. Make employee engagement a priority.
    • Many small businesses treat their employees like family. Thank them for hanging in there and acknowledge the financial and mental stress the pandemic has caused them.
    • Consider your reopening hours. Come up with a plan that is fluid for what schedules might look like under several different operating models.
    • Continue to stay in close communication with your team and share your plan with them when ready. Sharing your reopening plan reminds your team that they are a key factor in the success of your business.
  3. Vendors Hopefully you have been communicating with your vendors throughout all of this. Remember your vendors are an important part of the team.
    • Review your current inventory as compared to what you project your sales may be when you reopen (see cash flow in next column).
    • Initially cash flow will be tight, so talk with vendors now about payment options. Many of your vendors may be willing to consider 30, 45 or even 60 day payment options on any new orders. Remember they want you to succeed as well – you are their customer!
  4. Customers It most likely will take more than a “We Are Open” sign to get customers back in the door.
    • Customers may still be hesitant to be out in public. Start off with the basics such as making sure your establishment is fresh, clean and organized.
    • Re-engineer the physical space of your business to facilitate physical distancing among employees and between customers. Evaluate ways that protect employee and customer safety that make each comfortable interacting.
    • Depending on your business make sure, for example, that inventory is stocked, menus are updated, and you and your employees are ready to provide outstanding service.
    • Show you appreciate your customers through welcome back promotions, offering new services, and remembering to always thank them for their business.
  5. Cash Flow Prepare a projected income statement. Remember this is a projection but this exercise will help you be better
    • Statements should be broken down by months.
    • Include projected sales and all expenses.
    • Develop several scenarios that reflect what it may look like when you are back in business. prepared for fluctuations in cash flow.

Businesses that are best prepared to reopen, with a well thought out plan, will undoubtedly be the most successful!

Responsible Protocols for Getting Ohio Back to Work

Download this section as a fact sheet PDF

Guiding Principles:

  1. Protect the health of employees, customers and their families
  2. Support community efforts to control the spread of the virus
  3. Lead in responsibly getting Ohio back to work

5 Protocols for All Businesses:

  1. Recommend face coverings for employees and clients/customers.
  2. Conduct daily health assessments by employers and employees (self-evaluation) to determine if "fit for duty."
  3. Maintain good hygiene at all times – hand washing, sanitizing and social distancing.
  4. Clean and sanitize workplaces throughout workday and at the close of business or between shifts.
  5. Limit capacity to meet social distancing guidelines.
    • Establish maximum capacity at 50% of fire code.
    • And, use appointment setting where possible to limit congestion.

Take the Following Actions When a COVID-19 Infection is Identified:

  • Immediately report employee or customer infections to the local health district.
  • Work with local health department to identify potentially exposed individuals to help facilitate appropriate communication/contact tracing.
  • Shutdown shop/floor for deep sanitation if possible.
  • Professionally clean and sanitize site/location.
  • Reopen in consultation with the local health department.

Resources for Economic Support

Small Business Considerations During COVID-19 Outbreak

Review your financials and cash flow. How long can you “make it through” in case of a quarantine, lost wages, employee absenteeism (when you are paying for sick leave AND not bringing in revenue). What do you need to bridge the gap? Plan on a 6-8 month drop in revenues. Map out cash flow now.

Get a credit line approved now. You don't have to use it. But you'll have it when you need it.

Aggressively pursue accounts receivables. Engage your lenders (all SBA backed loans are eligible for deferral – however the lender must agree).

Slash your overhead. If you're worried about losing customers or employees due to sickness, school closures or possible quarantines, cut the things you don't HAVE to spend your money on.

Communicate, Communicate, Communicate and Get Online! Keep staff and customers informed and up-to-date on your operations. It's important for businesses to keep in touch with customers to help maintain them through this incident. Let them know what steps you are taking to ensure a safe and clean establishment; what your open hours are and how to communicate with you; use email auto-reply with answers to frequently asked questions to help your customers get information quickly; offer alternative methods of good deliveries (curbside service, at home delivery, drive-thrus, etc.).

Use online platforms, like Facebook and your website, to inform customers of your operating status and how to purchase your products or services. Communicate this information through direct email to customers and through social media such as Twitter. Make sure you have a Business Profile on Google. Postal mail might be a way for your message to get customers' attention who are being bombarded with emails.

Understand your insurance policy. What does your insurance cover? What doesn't it cover? It is recommended that you review your policy and consult with your provider to determine if your insurance covers any losses. The Ohio Department of Insurance has additional resources and information on their website at https://insurance.ohio.gov/.

Look at your supply chains. Are they diversified or are you relying on one source for your products? Supply chain management is essential in any global pandemic. Travel, workforce absenteeism, and financials will impact supply chains across the world. It's important you have multiple providers of a resource that is the core of your business. Consider partnering with other businesses to share a vendor contract. That will make your order larger and a higher priority to the provider and may help to reduce the costs of goods.

Develop an incident response plan. What do you have in place in case of a quarantine? Can your employees work from home? Can you sell online or deliver instead of staffing brick and mortar? What kind of technology can be implemented to reach your customers? What communication is in place to your customers and employees?

Identify essential functions and cross-train employees now so several can perform those tasks. Consider what programs or services could temporarily be shut down.

Think about potential disruptions in supplies, services and transportation in the likelihood those organizations experience employee absenteeism. Identify alternative vendors / suppliers / etc. and how to reach them.

Store information on your employees, vendors, and clients in an online account so it's accessible from any device.

Prepare for a disaster loan.

  • Complete and assemble 2019 and prior year financial statements.
  • Start documenting and forecasting the impacts of the situation.

In the past, SBA disaster loans have required many forms, can be confusing, and could take 3-6 weeks before receiving the money.

Practice Social Distancing! Social distancing is a term applied certain action to stop or slow down the spread of a highly contagious disease. Here's some action items you can implement quickly in your business:

  • Encourage staying more than three feet apart
  • Do not high five, shake hands or have close physical contact
  • Wash your hands more frequently and use hand sanitizer
  • Clean and disinfect your work and customer areas more frequently
  • Avoid touching your face, nose, or eyes

It may seem silly to have to continue to tell your employees to – wash your hands, cover your mouth when you sneeze or cough. But the truth is, habits are hard to break. Printing signs on your office printer can help as subtle reminders to your employees and customers to practice better personal hygiene – key to recovery from this illness, according to the public health experts.

Encourage Good Hygiene. Purchase hand sanitizer and encourage employees to start using it or washing hands per health agency guidance (alcohol-based hand sanitizer or wash hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds). Begin a “no handshaking” protocol NOW so it's ingrained in our daily routine if/when things get worse.

Encourage employees to regularly clean their work areas. Be prepared to do a thorough cleaning of your facility should you need to if employees are directly affected and have been on the property.

Dealing with COVID Exposure

  • Employees who are well but who have a sick family member at home with COVID-19 should notify their supervisor and refer to CDC guidance for how to conduct a risk assessment of their potential exposure.
  • If an employee is confirmed to have COVID-19, employers should inform fellow employees of their possible exposure to COVID-19 in the workplace but maintain confidentiality as required by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Employees exposed to a co-worker with confirmed COVID-19 should refer to CDC guidance for how to conduct a risk assessment of their potential exposure.

Reevaluate your sick leave policies. Under pandemic circumstances employees should be encouraged to stay at home beyond their currently authorized sick leave. Also take the time now to review what additional benefit options might be available to support and continue paying employees beyond usual sick leave periods when they may be infectious or need to stay home to take care of family members. An example would be “borrowing” sick leave from the next year, or providing “administrative leave.” Another approach is to establish special provisions just for COVID-19 circumstances.

New FEDERAL Paid Sick Leave Requirements Businesses with 500 OR FEWER EMPLOYEES must provide:

  • Paid sick leave – 2 weeks paid leave at 100% of employee's normal pay, up to $511 per day.
  • Paid family and medical leave – additional 12 weeks of paid family and medical leave at 67% of normal pay, up to $200 per day (small businesses can apply for a waiver of this in some limited circumstances).
  • Small businesses will get a tax credit to cover these costs.
  • Gig workers and independent contractors will get the same benefits in form of a tax credit.

Small businesses: you must provide paid sick leave and/or family/medical leave for any of your payroll workers (not contractors). The Federal Government will pick up the cost of this paid leave—by applying a credit for your 6.2% payroll social security taxes. If the credit is insufficient to cover those costs, the Federal Government will pay you directly. You or your workers do not have to be sick to qualify! Anyone told to quarantine, who is exposed to the virus, showing symptoms, or needs to get tests or preventive care qualifies. Family leave is easier—up to 3 months of paid leave to adhere to quarantine, take care of a sick family member or a child who is home because of their school being closed.

Gig worker/independent contractor: if you are paid by another company (e.g., a ride share company, a caterer, a worker platform like Upwork, another contracting company), you're eligible for a tax credit of up to 2 weeks sick leave at your average pay and 12 weeks of family/medical leave at 2/3 your average pay. The same caps apply--$511/$200 per day. You must show you had to comply with self-isolation or care for family members, including children whose schools had been closed due to the coronavirus. Tax credits will be applied against your tax payments, or you will get a rebate if your tax is lower than the credit.

Plan. Even if you're not currently negatively impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, you could be in the future depending upon circumstances, or you could face another type of business interruption. If you are in this situation, use your time now to develop a disaster recovery plan.

A Request. If you are planning a large event, small event, or a gathering…try not to cancel those events. The other small businesses you are working with depend on that cash flow too to survive. Rather, look at your contracts and see if you can reschedule the event for later in the year when this crisis subsides.

Business & Nonprofit Support

The following resources are available to businesses or nonprofits facing financial hardships.

Ohio PPE Retooling and Reshoring Grant Program Ohio businesses and nonprofit organizations need personal protective equipment, which remains in short supply.  We are working to solve that issue through the ingenuity of Ohio companies and their employees. The Ohio PPE Retooling and Reshoring Grant Program provides funds to help businesses innovate and create solutions to the PPE shortage.

Small and medium-sized manufacturers that retool existing facilities to make PPE or reshore PPE production to Ohio are eligible. The funding provides up to $500,000 per facility.

Needed PPE: Surgical masks, Gowns, Gloves, Community masks, Face shields, Thermometers, Hand sanitizer, Cleaning and sanitizing products,Other products and solutions.

Click here for program guidelines.

Click here to apply.

Ohio Minority Micro-Enterprise Grant Program Many Ohio small, minority- and women-owned businesses have been hard hit by the COVID-19 pandemic. The Ohio Minority Micro-Enterprise Grant Program provides $10,000 in funding to help these companies through the current crisis and set them up for the future.

To be eligible, businesses must have been certified as a Minority Business Enterprise or woman-owned EDGE-certified business as of Feb. 29, 2020; have 10 or fewer employees and up to $500,000 in annual revenue; and have not received funding under the federal CARES Act.

To qualify, businesses must be current on all taxes and private or public loans. Grants will be awarded on first-come, first-served basis.

Click here to apply.

Appalachian Growth Capital Loan Program Many small businesses in Ohio’s Appalachian region have been hit hard by the COVID-10 pandemic.  The Ohio Development Services Agency and the Governor’s Office of Appalachia will provide $10 million in funding to help these businesses through the crisis.

This new loan program provides funding to the Appalachian Growth Capital LLC, which is a U.S. Treasury-Certified Community Development Financial Institution that provides small business financing in the 32-county Appalachian region of eastern and southern Ohio.

  • Businesses located in the 32-county region with less than $40 million of revenue in the most recently completed tax year are eligible.
  • Appalachian Growth Capital will offer loans to small businesses at 2 percent interest.
  • The maximum loan amount is $500,000, and businesses will have the ability to defer payment for up to six months.

Businesses can apply at appcap.org.

Small Business Administration's (SBA) Economic Injury Disaster Loan Program Ohio small businesses and nonprofits are now eligible to apply for up to a $2 million, low-interest loan through the SBA. Apply online, which is recommended, or call (800) 659-2955 to have an application mailed to you.

The following resources are available to businesses or nonprofits facing financial hardships.

Small Business Administration's (SBA) Economic Injury Disaster Loan Program Ohio small businesses and nonprofits are now eligible to apply for up to a $2 million, low-interest loan through the SBA. Apply online, which is recommended, or call (800) 659-2955 to have an application mailed to you.

IRS Coronavirus Tax Relief The Treasury Department and IRS are providing relief to all taxpayers who have Federal income tax returns and Federal income tax payments due on April 15, 2020. The April 15, 2020 deadline is postponed to July 15, 2020. Associated interest, additions to tax, and penalties for late filing or late payment will be suspended until July 15, 2020 (Notice - 20-18).

Also, look at IRS News Release 2020-57, Treasury, IRS and Labor announced Coronavirus-related paid leave for workers and tax credits for small and midsize businesses to swiftly recover the cost of providing Coronavirus-related leave.

Liquor buyback The Ohio Department of Commerce will immediately begin offering a liquor buyback option to support bars and restaurants. This is intended to aid those establishments that have stocked up on high proof liquor, but now are facing closure to in-house patrons. Bars and restaurants can return unopened, high proof liquor products (obtained within the past 30 days) to the agency where they purchased the product. This opportunity is also extended to those with temporary (F2) permits for events scheduled between March 12 and April 6, 2020. Questions about this program should be directed to the Liquor Enterprise Service Center at 1-877-812-0013 or OhioLiquorInfo@Com.Ohio.gov.

Publicly Funded Daycares An executive order issued last week increased the number of children allowed to be supervised by childcare staff, depending on the type of program and ages of the children. The order also increased from 10 to 20 the number of paid absent days for providers serving children in the Publicly Funded Child Care program, and it provides childcare programs with 21 paid pandemic days if they must close their programs because of the pandemic. Read the Executive Order.

Workers' Compensation Insurance Premium Deferments Ohio's Bureau of Workers' Compensation (BWC) system is the exclusive provider of workers' compensation insurance in Ohio and serves 249,000 public and private employers. To help businesses facing difficulties due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Ohio BWC is announcing the deferment of insurance premium installment payments for March, April and May until June 1, 2020. For more information, visit bwc.ohio.gov.

Grace Period for Health Insurance Premiums All health insurers are required to provide the option of deferring premium payments, interest free, for up to 60 calendar days from each original premium due date. This means that employers can defer their premium payments up to two months, giving them some relief on costs, while keeping their employees insured. View ODI Bulletin 2020-03 PDF.

Keeping Essential Goods Moving The Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) has modified the process for haulers carrying heavy loads of essential goods. Generally, the state requires haulers with loads classified as “oversized” to seek advanced permission from ODOT before they are permitted to travel in and through the state. Haulers carrying essential goods can download and print the permit at Transportation.Ohio.gov. The federal government has also cut red tape around obtaining or renewing Commercial Drivers' Licenses (CDLs) and other licenses to prevent interruption of essential shipping. The Ohio Departments of Public Safety (ODPS) and the Public Utilities Commission (PUCO) have adjusted their enforcement practices to avoid confusion.

Learn new tech skills TechCred helps Ohioans learn new skills and helps employers build a stronger workforce with the skills needed in a tech-infused economy. Many of these trainings can be completed online. Learn more about TechCred.

Suspension of Pharmacy Audits Third party administrators, including Pharmacy Benefit Managers (PBMs) are required to suspend pharmacy audits during the state of emergency. Conducting or attempting to conduct pharmacy audits during the state of emergency may be considered a fraudulent, coercive, or dishonest practice, and may subject a third party administrator to legal action, including but not limited to, license suspension and/or monetary fines. This ensures that pharmacies can focus their resources on helping during this crisis as opposed to spending time on the paperwork associated with these types of audits. View ODI Bulletin 2020-04 PDF.

Commercial Property, Rent Evictions and Foreclosures Governor Mike DeWine has issued an executive order that requests that landlords suspend, for at least 90 days, rent payments for small business commercial tenants facing financial hardship due to the COVID-19 pandemic; landlords place a moratorium on evictions of small business commercial tenants for at least 90 days; lenders provide commercial real estate borrowers with mortgage loans an opportunity for a forbearance of at least 90 days as a result of a financial hardship due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Wi-Fi HotSpots BroadbandOhio, the state's office dedicated to improving access to high-speed internet, has been working with providers to find public hotspot locations that Ohioans can use in areas where they may not otherwise have access to internet from home. Providers not currently listed that are offering public wi-fi hotspots are encouraged to email together@governor.ohio.gov with contact information, and a representative from BroadbandOhio will follow-up. Check out Wi-Fi hotspot locations in Ohio.

Petroleum Underground Storage Tank Release Compensation Board The Petroleum Underground Storage Tank Release Compensation Board will be extending the deadlines for the submission of Applications for Financial Assurance Fund Eligibility, Claim Reimbursement Applications and requests for cost pre-approval, and all related requests for additional information. The extension of time took effect on March 14, 2020 and will remain in effect for 90 days. Responsible parties with questions regarding the filing deadlines are advised to contact the Board's office at 614-752-8963 or 800-224-4659. Additional information can also be found at: www.petroboard.org

State Tax Filing and Payment Extensions The deadline to file and pay state income tax without interest or penalty has been extended to July 15 for individual income tax, school district income tax, pass-through entity and fiduciary income tax, and municipal net profit taxpayers that have opted into the state's centralized filing system. View full details on tax changes.

Dispute Resolution Commission A Dispute Resolution Commission has been established to evaluate and render guidance in situations where two local health departments have come to a different conclusion for similar businesses on what is or is not an essential business. This will help provide uniformity. For example, a chain store may be operating as an essential business in one jurisdiction, but not another.

The local determination in question may be submitted to the Commission by either of the local health departments, or an entity or person subject to the determination. The Commission will review requests submitted and decide the outcome of the Order to the conflict. The decision of the Dispute Resolution Commission shall be final.

To submit a dispute, fill out this Dispute Resolution Form PDF and submit it to Dispute.Resolution@odh.ohio.gov.

Layoff Alternatives

If your company is facing decisions about layoffs, consider these options first.

Businesses with fewer than 500 employees are eligible for assistance to keep employees on their payroll through the end of June. Through the federal CARES Act, small businesses are eligible for a variety of assistance options through the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA), including (SBA.Gov)

SBA Paycheck Protection Program

  • This program was designed by Congress to help businesses in need during the COVID crisis.
  • According to the SBA, loans can be fully forgiven if the funds are used for:
    • Payroll costs
    • Interest on mortgages
    • Rent
    • Utilities
  • No collateral or personal guarantees are required. Neither the government nor lenders will charge small businesses any fees.

If you have more questions, please download the Paycheck Protection Program Loans - Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) document prepared by the U.S. Department of the Treasury.

For more information, visit SBA.gov/PaycheckProtection

Businesses of all sizes that are closed or distressed are eligible for a fully refundable tax credit to help them keep workers on the payroll. The credit covers 50 percent of payroll on the first $10,000 of compensation, including health benefits, for each employee. Different requirements apply depending on business size. For companies with more than 100 employees, only wages paid to employees when they are not providing services due to COVID-19 qualify. For companies with less than 100 employees, all employee wages qualify for the credit. For the latest information about SBA incentives, refer to sba.gov. Further details are forthcoming.

Ohio's premier layoff aversion program, SharedWork Ohio, helps employers retain trained staff during times of business downturn. Under a SharedWork plan, the employer reduces the employees' hours in a uniform manner and JFS supplements eligible employees' income with a proportionate share of unemployment. Right now, the federal government is fully funding these benefits paid to employees. Learn more at jfs.ohio.gov/ouio/SharedWorkOhio/.

Rapid Response resources are available to assist companies proactively with talent needs or to minimize negative impacts of layoffs. Rapid Response teams will work with your company to quickly maximize public and private resources to minimize the disruptions that are associated with job losses on your business, your workers, and the communities in which you do business and live. Rapid Response can provide customized services on-site at an affected your company, accommodate any work schedules, and assist company leadership and affected workers through the painful transitions associated with job loss. If you are looking to access skilled workers, are expecting a layoff or plant closing, or want to learn more, contact Ohio's rapid response manager, Breeyn Handberg, at 614-466-9897 or breeyn.handberg@jfs.ohio.gov.

After reviewing the alternatives above, any employer still considering layoffs (full separation from their company) or a furlough (mandatory, temporary, unpaid leave) must carefully consider:

Banking Updates

The DeWine-Husted Administration has worked with representatives from Ohio's banking community. These companies recognize the hardships that many Ohioans are facing, and they have committed to working through creative ways to help. Ohioans can be confident that banks, both big and small, will be there for them as we move through the crisis and are offering several measures to help customers.

  • Banks across the state are taking steps to offer loan payment deferrals, fee waivers or refunds and extend credit lines to both businesses and individuals. Many banks are also suspending foreclosures where possible. Recent federal guidelines give financial institutions more tools to help Ohioans and the banking industry has welcomed these changes.
  • Banks are also showing customers how to protect themselves from coronavirus-related scams and encouraging Ohioans to use digital banking features like mobile apps, online banking or banking by phone. If you need help, please reach out to your bank for assistance.
  • Banks and credit unions across the state are taking steps to offer loan payment deferrals, fee waivers or refunds and extend credit lines to both businesses and individuals. Many financial institutions are also suspending foreclosures where possible. Recent federal guidelines give our financial institutions more tools to help Ohioans and the banking industry has welcomed these changes.
  • Learn more at ohiobankersleague.com/customers, ohiocreditunions.org and www.cbao.com.

Goldman Sachs Investment in Ohio Goldman Sachs has specifically committed to providing $20 million for loans to small businesses in Ohio. Loans will be made to small businesses under the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) through the CARES Act. These loans can be partially or wholly forgiven for businesses who maintain or rehire their workforce, and can be used to help with payroll costs, interest on mortgages, rent, and utilities. Learn more at GS.com/SmallBusiness.

Questions and Answers

How do I apply for the Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) Program?

Answer You can apply for the loan online at disasterloan.sba.gov/ela, which is recommended, or by calling 1-800-659-2955 to have an application mailed to you.

I had to stop in the middle of my EIDL application. Will my information save?

Answer Unfortunately, if you stop in the middle of the application, it will not save information, and you will have to start over.

Where can I find personal protection equipment for my business or nonprofit?

Answer Ohio Emergency PPE Makers’ Exchange The Ohio Emergency PPE Makers’ Exchange, launched by the Ohio Manufacturing Alliance to Fight COVID-19, is an online marketplace where organizations that need personal protective equipment (PPE) and related equipment can find a wide selection offered by Ohio manufacturers. This online exchange offers PPE and related equipment for health care workers, first responders, and small businesses. It’s especially well-suited for organizations that may have lower-volume needs, such as nursing homes, police departments, and small business employers.

The Alliance has screened to the best of its ability for only Ohio manufacturers, but it has not vetted each product and vendor.

The Alliance also has created this list of practical things manufacturers need to be thinking about and do today to prepare for COVID-19.

JobsOhio PPE Database Several Ohio companies are working to increase the supply of in-demand medical PPE. JobsOhio has partnered with OMA, the Administration and with our Regional Network partners to provide assistance. A list of manufacturers, distributors and potential contract manufacturers to connect with these resources is available through JobsOhio’s Ohio Safe. Ohio Working. website.

Additional Resources

In addition to the resources available via the Ohio Manufacturing Alliance and JobsOhio, the Ohio Development Services Agency and Ohio Department of Administrative Services has compiled another list of vendors providing various PPE is available here PDF.

DISCLAIMER: Links on this page are to third party websites not controlled or monitored by the Ohio Development Services Agency. Development is not responsible for any materials, information or content posted on any linked third-party website. The inclusion of any links or contact information on this page does not imply any relationship or association between the Ohio Development Services Agency, the State of Ohio, and the listed business; nor is it an advertisement or endorsement of the linked websites. Information is provided for user convenience and information purposes only. You are responsible for your access to linked websites or contact of any individual or business

How can I apply for unemployment if I’m self-employed or have other special circumstances?

Answer Unemployed Ohioans who do not meet the criteria for regular jobless benefits can start preregistering for a new federal program on Friday, April 24, according to the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (ODJFS).

[Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) is authorized by the CARES Act. To apply, click here and then click on "Get Started Now." PUA benefits will be similar to regular unemployment benefits plus an additional $600 per week through July 25.

By preregistering, people can get in line early so that as soon as the agency has the ability to process claims in May, they can complete the paperwork.

For those eligible, PUA benefits will be retroactive to the date they qualified, as early as February 2. The program will provide up to 39 weeks of benefits to many who historically have not qualified for unemployment benefits, such as self-employed workers, 1099 tax filers, part-time workers, and those who lack sufficient work history. Individuals who have exhausted all regular unemployment and any weekly extensions also may be eligible for the program. Anyone with questions should call (833) 604-0774.

Where can I find more information regarding the COVID-19 outbreak?

Answer Please visit coronavirus.ohio.gov or call 1-833-4-ASK-ODH (1-833-427-5634).

Can my business reopen?

Answer A complete list of businesses that remain closed under the most recent order is available here. All businesses permitted to reopen must follow the required safety protocols outlined here.

Where can I find more information on the Federal Economic Stimulus Package?

Answer The Federal Economic Stimulus (CARES Act) was recently signed into law. The U.S. Small Business Administration is reviewing the new law and will soon be issuing rules and guidelines for small businesses. In the meantime, additional guidance and loan information is available here: Cares Act Small Business Guide PDF.

Where can I find more information on the unemployment compensation system?

Answer Please visit the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services Coronavirus and unemployment information page. If you have any other questions regarding unemployment, you are encouraged to reach out to Job and Family Services at 1-877-644-6562, from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday-Friday and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.

I have already submitted the "Estimated Disaster Economic Injury Worksheet." Do I still need to submit an application on the U.S. Small Business Administration site?

Answer The Estimated Disaster Economic Injury Worksheet was required for the state to receive its emergency declaration from the U.S. Small Business Administration. Now that Ohio has qualified for the Economic Injury Disaster Loan Program, you will need to submit an application with the SBA. You can do so at disasterloan.sba.gov/ela.

Are there any other resources available to my business and/or employees?

Answer If you have already sent an email to BusinessHelp@Development.ohio.gov, you have been added to our contact list and will receive updated information as it becomes available. To be added to our contact list, please send an email to BusinessHelp@Development.ohio.gov from your preferred email address.

How do I determine which federal financing program is best for me?

Answer America's Small Business Development Center Network has put together a helpful comparison document PDF that highlights the differences between the currently available financing programs.

Contact us

If you have additional questions, please send us a message at BusinessHelp@Development.Ohio.Gov. To be connected to the Small Business Administration or your local Manufacturing Extension Partnership organization, Procurement and Technical Assistance Center, Minority Business Assistance Center or Small Business Development Center, please call 1-833-BIZ-OHIO (1-833-249-6446).